#redtape

What happened when Baltimore went soft on crime

Arrests chg

In April 2015, a black man by the name of Freddie Gray died from injuries sustained in a police van. His death sparked outrage and riots in Baltimore. The 6 officers (3 black, 3 white) who faced trial for his death were either acquitted or had the charges dropped.

According to Larry Elder, despite claims that the city was suffering from systemic racism at the time of his death, the mayor of Baltimore City was black, the AG was black, the police chief was black, his deputy was black, the majority of the command centre was black and the city council members were predominantly black and all Democrat. We shouldn’t forget that the US president was also black.

As a result of the riots that followed Gray’s death, the Baltimore City Police Department (BCPD) went soft on crime. Police actions fell off a cliff. Arrests had been declining for years but decelerated even quicker post-2015.

From 2014 to 2017, dispatch records show the number of field interviews fell 70%. Suspected narcotics offences reported by police fell 30%. The number of people BCPD reported seeing with outstanding warrants dropped by half.  The acting police commissioner admitted, “In all candour, officers are not as aggressive as they once were, pre-2015. It’s just that fact.

Rape surged.

Rapes

Homicides exploded. In 2017, Baltimore hit its highest per-capita murder rate ever. It was double Chicago’s rate and in absolute numbers higher than New York, a city 14 times as populous.

Homicides

An informal survey of 15% of BCPD officers taken by the council showed that officers were afraid to make arrests in the aftermath. A third of those surveyed had served in BCPD for over 20 years.

40% said they felt “inadequately trained

43% said they do not feel “comfortable making self-initiated arrests

68% said they do not feel “city leadership supports law enforcement.”

74% said they “feel restricted by the consent decree,”

78% said they felt the department had “lowered hiring standards.

One officer responded, “Morale won’t rise until the Department and its officers receive consistent public support from the Mayor, City Council and State’s Attorney. No one is asking that corruption be tolerated. What we are asking is that when we investigate crimes and make arrests or issue citations that our elected leaders support us when we encounter resistance.

Another mentioned, “We don’t have enough people in my unit. The volume of cases we have is absurd given our manpower. It leads to mistakes, and inadequate follow up investigations which lead to sloppy prosecutions. None of which is for lack of trying.

A shortage of funds? The budget for the BCPD has grown from $455 million in FY2015 to $536 million for FY2020, begging the question of why arrests and prosecution of crime haven’t matched the increased spending?

When analysing the breakdown of the BCPD budget, composition matters. Police patrolling will decline from $253 million in 2015 to $202 million in the 2020 budget. The number of police allocated to patrol will fall from 1,851 to 1,363 during the same period. Administration expenses will jump from $44 million to $94 million. Crime investigation will rise from $52 million to $53 million off from the low of $35 million in 2019.

Just as we saw with our study on fire services around Australia at the time of the bushfires, more money doesn’t always lead to better outcomes if those custodians don’t have the skills to sensibly allocate those extra dollars.

Like many government bureaus or departments, it doesn’t appear to be a question of just throwing more money at policing but far better stewardship of funds, a more defined focus of mission and a council that supports law enforcement by cutting red tape which leads to the types of outcomes that benefit the community at large.

Woke policing doesn’t work. Baltimore is proof.

What happened when Baltimore went soft on crime

Arrests chg

In April 2015, a black man by the name of Freddie Gray died from injuries sustained in a police van. His death sparked outrage and riots in Baltimore. The 6 officers (3 black, 3 white) who faced trial for his death were either acquitted or had the charges dropped.

According to Larry Elder, despite claims that the city was suffering from systemic racism at the time of his death, the mayor of Baltimore City was black, the AG was black, the police chief was black, his deputy was black, the majority of the command centre was black and the city council members were predominantly black and all Democrat. We shouldn’t forget that the US president was also black.

As a result of the riots that followed Gray’s death, the Baltimore City Police Department (BCPD) went soft on crime. Police actions fell off a cliff. Arrests had been declining for years but decelerated even quicker post-2015.

From 2014 to 2017, dispatch records show the number of field interviews fell 70%. Suspected narcotics offences reported by police fell 30%. The number of people BCPD reported seeing with outstanding warrants dropped by half.  The acting police commissioner admitted, “In all candour, officers are not as aggressive as they once were, pre-2015. It’s just that fact.

Rape surged.

Rapes

Homicides exploded. In 2017, Baltimore hit its highest per-capita murder rate ever. It was double Chicago’s rate and in absolute numbers higher than New York, a city 14 times as populous.

Homicides

An informal survey of 15% of BCPD officers taken by the council showed that officers were afraid to make arrests in the aftermath. A third of those surveyed had served in BCPD for over 20 years.

40% said they felt “inadequately trained

43% said they do not feel “comfortable making self-initiated arrests

68% said they do not feel “city leadership supports law enforcement.”

74% said they “feel restricted by the consent decree,”

78% said they felt the department had “lowered hiring standards.

One officer responded, “Morale won’t rise until the Department and its officers receive consistent public support from the Mayor, City Council and State’s Attorney. No one is asking that corruption be tolerated. What we are asking is that when we investigate crimes and make arrests or issue citations that our elected leaders support us when we encounter resistance.

Another mentioned, “We don’t have enough people in my unit. The volume of cases we have is absurd given our manpower. It leads to mistakes, and inadequate follow up investigations which lead to sloppy prosecutions. None of which is for lack of trying.

A shortage of funds? The budget for the BCPD has grown from $455 million in FY2015 to $536 million for FY2020, begging the question of why arrests and prosecution of crime haven’t matched the increased spending?

When analysing the breakdown of the BCPD budget, composition matters. Police patrolling will decline from $253 million in 2015 to $202 million in the 2020 budget. The number of police allocated to patrol will fall from 1,851 to 1,363 during the same period. Administration expenses will jump from $44 million to $94 million. Crime investigation will rise from $52 million to $53 million off from the low of $35 million in 2019.

Just as we saw with our study on fire services around Australia at the time of the bushfires, more money doesn’t always lead to better outcomes if those custodians don’t have the skills to sensibly allocate those extra dollars.

Like many government bureaus or departments, it doesn’t appear to be a question of just throwing more money at policing but far better stewardship of funds, a more defined focus of mission and a council that supports law enforcement by cutting red tape which leads to the types of outcomes that benefit the community at large.

Woke policing doesn’t work. Baltimore is proof.

Iceland legislates equal pay for women

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Google statistics on the gender pay gap and you can find an endless supply of stats supporting women earning a fraction of that of men. Iceland has now made it law. Companies with 25 members of staff and over are obliged to obtain government certification of their equal-pay policies or face being slapped with financial penalties. It makes absolute sense to pay equally for identical work but we all know from our own experiences that all workers don’t perform equally in the same role. That goes for both genders.

Take two salespeople (ignore gender for now). They both work the same hours, are both the same age and have exactly the same qualities. Over whatever time period set the first outsells the second person on a 2:1 basis. Competition in their industry is rife and the employer is worried that it might lose one of is better performers if it can’t reward them appropriately.

In a previous role as head of a sales department, the top saleswoman was paid considerably more than male counterparts for “performance”. Same role, same rank, similar age and tenure. Better pay. It was rational. Gender was irrelevant. Performance was what mattered. Would the Iceland law makers censure the gender discrimination against the men in the team? Not likely. Surely it would turn a blind eye and inwardly celebrate an overturn of decades of perceived injustice!

Companies will get tied up in irrelevant, costly and onerous red tape to defend common sense. That is time consuming. Companies will need to hire a whole department to protect them from behaving too commercially or rationally. All of a sudden instead of dealing with customers staff and management spend a growing amount of time ticking internal boxes so the company doesn’t get into any trouble. Customers lose and ultimately the company becomes less profitable as a result. Lose lose.

Take it a step further. If companies could hire one group for 20% less than another for exactly the same output why would they bother paying a premium for it? Makes no sense. So the argument that women are paid less for the same role is nonsense. Why would companies bother to hire men?

Take the world of super models. The top 20 females get paid north of $1mn per annum. There are two males that achieve it. Where are the masculinists screaming for equal pay? Is it not the corporation that sees more value in having Giselle Blundchen’s sultry looks than some 6-packed dude from the Polo Ralph Lauren catalogue? Same work? Not same pay! Still Giselle’s agents know her value to the ultimate revenues of a cosmetics company that Joey Sixpack simply can’t generate. Is that unfair? Surely if Giselle has her pay capped at 1/10th current pay she might refuse to work.

Regardless of the debate over gender balance, it is not strange to see men dominate the numbers in the military, emergency services and construction. These are workplace choices. If 80% of the people who want to apply for a particular industry are men or women then why force gender balance? Doesn’t the sheer number of men or women applying for a particular type of job speak volumes about real interest? Should army recruiters in Australia face demotion if they don’t hit gender targets? Should we want our military to be a social experiment or the most capable force of defending a nation? If more men are willing and capable to serve in artillery battalions why should we deny them? Isn’t motivation a desirable trait?

Another flaw in the gender pay argument is that of classification. Stanford Professor Thomas Sowell suggested personal and workplace choices account for much of the gap…perhaps the biggest reason is biology. Women make up 50% of the workforce but give birth to 100% of the babies. And if women choose to have children, their incentives change and this affects their choices of jobs, careers, continual service and hours spent on the job…and data compiled from the Census Bureau, unmarried women who’ve never had a child actually earn more than unmarried men…according to the Labor Department, “of men and women who work 30 to 34 hours a week, women make more, 109 percent of men’s earnings.

Of Sowell’s points, continual service is important. If a woman takes 10 years out of the workforce to raise kids while her husband is able to continue in his job one would imagine prospects for promotion would be on balance higher than hers if she returned to the workforce after a long absence. It doesn’t preclude women couldn’t climb a ladder or overtake her hubby but on balance this is but one factor.

The gender pay gap is a statisticians dream. One could slice and dice it to get the result one wants. However isn’t it an insult to women to think they need a regulated leg up in life? Some of the most successful women Known to CM are determined and the last thing that crosses their mind is that being a women is an impediment. Their drive and determination was an inspiration.

The left leaning Fairfax Media is already pointing fingers at Australia to adopt Iceland’s lead. Just what Australian industry needs. More red tape.