#NYTimes

Orange man not paying his greens?

The New York Times has run a hit piece on Trump’s tax records. The paper noted,

The New York Times has obtained tax-return data extending over more than two decades for Mr. Trump and the hundreds of companies that make up his business organization, including detailed information from his first two years in office. It does not include his personal returns for 2018 or 2019. This article offers an overview of The Times’s findings; additional articles will be published in the coming weeks.

Drip feeding news is a good strategy as it takes heat off Biden’s basement dwelling and the civil unrest which has been literally been burning the Democrats due to their lack of condemnation. The media circus will run with it non stop.

Although the Amy Coney Barrett Senate SCOTUS confirmation hearings will no doubt be another farcical character assassination which will blow up in the Democrats’ faces.

For the record, if Trump ‘evaded‘ taxes, we would have no issue whatsoever with any punishment that fit the crime. However, ‘avoidance‘ is what any sane rational individual/corporation does, as Kerry Packer reminded us in 1991.

While no surprise, media outlets have blindly forwarded the ‘tax bombshell,’ without seeming to question the validity or reliability of the tax sources which the NYT is basing the claims. Then again why would they? Orange man bad. Destroy at all costs. Worry about facts later.

Are these anonymous and undisclosed sources similar to those which accused him of calling slain soldiers, “suckers” and “losers“?

The NYT wrote,

In response to a letter summarizing The Times’s findings, Alan Garten, a lawyer for the Trump Organization, said that “most, if not all, of the facts appear to be inaccurate” and requested the documents on which they were based. After The Times declined to provide the records, in order to protect its sources, Mr. Garten took direct issue only with the amount of taxes Mr. Trump had paid.”

His taxes could well have been leaked by NY State attorneys investigating him. That in and of itself is a criminal offence.

For the NYT, if Trump loses office thanks to this hit job, it will matter not if the details were fabricated because the incoming government would view it as the ends justifying the means.

Almost three years ago, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow hailed she had Trump’s 2005 tax return which showed he paid $38m tax on $150m income.

Fast forward to November 3rd, 2020.

Are voters going to be more concerned with how much tax he has or hasn’t paid or whether he is going to be more able to get the economy back on track as the record pre-COVID showed quite clearly as evidenced by the most recent SOTU? Jobs and economic prosperity matter. Period.

Ultimately voters still elected a man who was on tape bragging about grabbing female genitalia. With that in mind, is avoiding taxes more of an election issue than crotch cupping?

We are 40 days away. Paying only $750 in income tax is optically terrible. No question. Although he isn’t drawing a salary.

Given the allegations, the services of this tax accountant seem rather skillful. If he has merely taken advantage of the tax laws, that is about as American as it gets.

Let’s wait until we see more of these claims. Perhaps Trump releases some of his TC returns to put the media’s lies on display.

NY Times plunges new lows – if that was possible

What a disgrace. NY Times journalist Murray Carpenter and photographer Tristan Spinsky want to run a story which publicizes Fox presenter Tucker Carlson’s home address to get him off the air. Imagine if Tucker Carlson reported where NY Times editors and journalists lived? We would never hear the end of it.

No matter how abhorrent NYT might find Carlson’s politics to be, his family should be totally off-limits. We thought that Bari Weiss’ resignation letter was the peak of the disgraceful antics at the NYT.

This is criminal, sinister and a perfect example of how reprehensible the one reputable paper has become. Instead of crushing Carlson’s arguments with facts and logic, they want to cancel him. Tells us all we need to know.

Can the NYT or WaPo top this for nauseating adoration of a failed leader?

It is hard to believe that anything could top the gut-wrenching nausea of this opinion piece in The Age. NYT or WaPo might blush.

Dan Andrews, for our foreign readers, is the deeply left-leaning Premier of Victoria who is facing criticism over deploying poorly trained private security guards who slept with guests staying in hotels during lockdown and contracted coronavirus. The Age is a left-leaning mainstream newspaper in Australia.

Warning: Keep a bucket by your side when you read it.

More double standards in the mainstream media

Two things from last week which carry on with the theme of double standards within the mainstream media. These are so unbelievable that one could be confused to think it was satire coming from the Babylon Bee.

First MSNBC has hired Lisa Page, the lover of former FBI special agent Peter Strzok as a legal analyst. Recall their SMS conversations…no bias there…

FBI report: Anti-Trump texts 'cast a cloud' over email probe

Then The New York Times, despite an invitation, couldn’t publish an opinion piece by Senator Tom Cotton which suggested military support to support law enforcement was sensible because apparently, “Running this puts Black people, including Black @nytimes staff, in danger.”

Apparently, the words of a sitting US senator were deemed more offensive, divisive and dangerous than other NYT opinion pieces from Putin, Erdogan and the Taliban they were only too pleased to publish.

Sen. Cotton said in response, “My Op-Ed doesn’t meet the New York Times’ standards…It far exceeds their standards, which are normally full of left-wing, sophomoric drivel…in the face of the woke mob of woke kids that are in their newsroom.

Never mind the MorningConsult poll which revealed 58% of voters, including a 48% plurality of Democrats who said they’d support bringing in U.S. troops to supplement city police forces amid the protests.

All the news that is fit to print? If the left didn’t have double standards, they wouldn’t have any.

The best description of Twitter ever

yoelroth

If anyone wants to be informed, Twitter is one of the least likely platforms to find it. A fair and neutral playground marshalled by an unbiased hall monitor? Pfffft. We have included the best description of Twitter ever at the end. First some context.

Twitter updated its new rules on May 11th, 2020 vis-a-vis fact-checking and integrity. Of course, the platform, like YouTube and Facebook, decides what it deems appropriate. Who could forget when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before the Senate that Silicon Valley – where most of the tech world is headquartered – is “an extremely left-leaning place” and the evidence shows what side of politics gets fact-checked.

Twitter’s Head of Site Integrity, Yoel Roth (@yoyoel) is an avid anti-Trumper. Several days after the 2016 election he proudly tweeted, “I’m just saying, we fly over those states that voted for a racist tangerine for a reason.” We should sleep soundly at night that he also referred to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as “a personality-free bag of farts.” Surely there is no risk of conservative bias with the integrity team at Twitter…sleep soundly.

Recall the time The NY Times hired Sarah Jeong who had tweeted “Cancel White People” among a laundry list of crude bile. Twitter did nothing despite being exposed and the newspaper endorsed her hire regardless (she has since been let go). Black conservative, Candace Owens exchanged the words “white” for “Jewish” and “Black” and was swiftly suspended.

F3570C69-B33D-4BA2-B56F-39A01CEA5DAD.jpeg

We wrote yesterday of our amusement that Twitter chose to use a brazenly anti-Trump media outlet like CNN, which has been regularly caught lying to fact-check the president. How amusing it was to hear White House Counsel Kellyanne Conway tell reporters how the media has no problems immediately retweeting items without a second’s thought to verifying.

Stephen Fry perhaps made the most accurate description of the social media site a few years back.

It’s no big deal – as it shouldn’t be. But yes, for anyone interested I have indeed deactivated my Twitter account…It’s quite simple really: the room had started to smell. Really quite bad.

Oh goodness, what fun Twitter was in the early days, a secret bathing-pool in a magical glade in an enchanted forest. It was glorious ‘to turn as swimmers into cleanness leaping.’ We frolicked and water-bombed and sometimes, in the moonlight, skinny-dipped. We chattered and laughed and put the world to rights and shared thoughts sacred, silly and profane. But now the pool is stagnant. It is frothy with scum, clogged with weeds and littered with broken glass, sharp rocks and slimy rubbish. If you don’t watch yourself, with every move you’ll end up being gashed, broken, bruised or contused. Even if you negotiate the sharp rocks you’ll soon feel that too many people have peed in the pool for you to want to swim there any more. The fun is over.

To leave that metaphor, let us grieve at what Twitter has become. A stalking ground for the sanctimoniously self-righteous who love to second-guess, to leap to conclusions and be offended – worse, to be offended on behalf of others they do not even know. It’s as nasty and unwholesome a characteristic as can be imagined. It doesn’t matter whether they think they’re defending women, men, transgender people, Muslims, humanists … the ghastliness is absolutely the same. It makes sensible people want to take an absolutely opposite point of view. I’ve heard people shriek their secularism in such a way as to make me want instantly to become an evangelical Christian…

Why are 28,000 US COVID19 deaths overreported?

We are curious as to why the US Government’s official Centre for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) records only 37,308 COVID19 deaths as of April 25th-end when Johns Hopkins University (JHU) reports over 65,000…that is a c.75% difference.

CDC explained its methodology as follows,

The provisional counts for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) deaths are based on a current flow of mortality data in the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS). National provisional counts include deaths occurring within the 50 states and the District of Columbia that have been received and coded as of the date specified. It is important to note that it can take several weeks for death records to be submitted to National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), processed, coded, and tabulated.

In short, the data recorded is that of the official cause of death plugged into the national database.

JHU reports its data gathering as follows:

Johns Hopkins experts are aggregating data from multiple credible sources to track the spread of COVID-19…

…The tracking map’s data powers a number of external research and visualization efforts by prominent media organizations such as CNN, The New York Times, The Guardian, and the Associated Press [all media organizations with an axe to grind]. But its data is also used by smaller organizations, such as Blauer’s data team at the Centers for Civic Impact (CCI).”

Interestingly, the CCI, which was newly instituted at JHU, tried to explain the discrepancy.

Obtaining accurate and timely data about the spread of the virus has become an unexpected challenge in the United States. While the federal government has traditionally been the most authoritative source for national public health data, this has proved not to be the case with the coronavirus pandemic. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the nation’s official source for public health surveillance data, has not kept its site updated with information available through state and local health departments. 

Even if we accept that the official CDC data is delayed by up to two weeks, we are surprised the figures are out by a factor of 28,000 deaths or almost 75%. Will the data JHU gleans from state and local health departments differ to those eventually supplied to the NCHS for publishing by the CDC?

Perhaps we should be a little suspicious of CCI’s noble quest for data when it published a piece which expressed the following statement:

Aggregating information from dozens of sources is challenging and time-consuming, so volunteer projects have stepped in to fill the gap. One major backbone of this effort has been the COVID Tracking Project. Started by two journalists from The Atlantic and a data scientist from Related Sciences, the COVID Tracking Project scrapes data directly from state public health websites so that its numbers are constantly current.”

Volunteers? Journalists from The Atlantic, an unhinged left-leaning newspaper which makes Pravda look like the Volkischer Beobachter? Why is a reputable university relying on such sources? Who validates and peer reviews that data to ensure accuracy? Are the volunteers activists? All valid questions.

To be honest, as a data driven group, FNF Media does not see data collection across 50 states as that time consuming. Much of it is in CSV format making it easy to download.

At the conclusion of the pandemic the numbers should show little variance. We watch with interest to see the final audit. Perhaps we can start with JHU’s current 65,000 number and wait another 2 weeks for CDC to publish the official figures and see just how (in)accurate the numbers are.

No wonder the media has a field day on the data which paints a scarier picture. They might source JHU but not disclose the volunteers that compile it.

It’s just hard to reconcile how a university which has $6 billion in annual revenues can’t divert resources to conduct the research in house?!

Bill Maher bashes MSM for ‘panic porn’ obsession surrounding COVID19

Liberal media host Bill Maher made another sensible 5-minute video which bashes up the mainstream media for its obsession with ‘panic porn’, ridiculous alarmism and confected hysteria.

Maher’s best line was to call out The NY Times for using a North Hollywood event planner to get a quote for a headline which described unemployment as “terrifying.”

 

Debunking liberal funking

An interesting dialogue between liberal media host Bill Maher and Republican congressman, Rep Dan Crenshaw.

It is refreshing to see such a civil dialogue when context and perspective are provided around mainstream media narratives.

One interesting tidbit for FNF Media was why Nancy Pelosi delayed bringing the vote on a $2.5bn supplemental bill to support the CDC, NIH and FDA to help combat the virus to the floor by a week? Instead, she put forward legislation on whether to ban flavoured tobacco. Priorities.

It is a worthwhile 15 minutes.

Nikki Haley’s perspective

Former US Ambassador to the UN gave her 10c worth on coronavirus from the perspective of having been a governor herself. What she says is not dissimilar to that of Australia and the federal-state relationship.

Overheated critics of President Trump accuse him of being an authoritarian. Of not caring about checks and balances, civil rights, and constitutional limits on executive power. And yet, today, many of these same critics demand that he nationalize supply chains, deploy the military on our shores and shut down every town in America. It’s a curious thing.

The coronavirus presents enormous national challenges that call for a strong federal response. But we should not lose sight of the essential role that states and governors must play. America is better served when presidents respect the diversity of states instead of dictating uniform solutions.

As a governor, when you take the oath of office to serve your state, you don’t know what will come your way. During my six years as governor of South Carolina, I dealt with a thousand-year flood, damaging hurricanes, a racially driven church shooting, a white police officer who killed an innocent black victim, and a school shooting.

When times were calm, we would try to get ahead of the curve, holding regular meetings with my emergency team to make sure we were up-to-date on supplies, procedures, logistics and technology. We learned the importance of planning and to control what we could.

I was a Republican governor with a Democrat in the White House. We disagreed on most policy matters, but we put those differences aside to serve the immediate needs of our joint constituents. You don’t serve your people if you let politics get in the way.

If you know a crisis is coming, one of the first things a governor will do is reach out to the White House to coordinate F.E.M.A. relief before it hits. Then, when the trouble arrives, everyone is on the same page.

F.E.M.A. typically sends a liaison who coordinates efforts and assesses vulnerabilities. It’s technical stuff. It requires knowing your own state and building a relationship with those on the federal level who apportion resources. It takes time, effort and foresight.

Once a crisis hits, state responsibility is primary. The federal government can provide crucial resources, but the burden is on the governor and her team to distribute them. No two states are alike, and blanket approaches won’t work.

In today’s crisis, governors from both parties have exemplified strong leadership. They know their residents and their state’s needs better than anyone in the federal government. In the state-federal partnership, governors are in the best position to control what happens on the ground, better than any president could be.

Governors know their state’s mayors and local officials who facilitate aid distribution. They know their local national guard leadership, which in many cases provides essential logistical support. They know their business leaders, who are being called on to uproot their production and services while keeping as many people employed as possible. They know their hospital administrators, who have eyes on the front-line heroes in this war. And they know the leaders of their faith communities, who often spearhead life-saving humanitarian projects.

As our highest nationally elected leader, of course President Trump has enormous responsibility in this unprecedented crisis, and he is marshaling the federal response on a massive scale. But in implementing plans to save people’s lives and keep our economy afloat, look no further than the governors.

They have complicated and difficult jobs. In this crisis, as in any, some are showing their competence and leadership, while others are revealing their shortcomings. It’s true that states shouldn’t have to compete, to bid against each other for supplies at inflated prices. And party politics shouldn’t factor in disbursing federal resources to states. But, most often, this is not the case. Governors who complain about the Trump administration are, in some cases, attempting to distract from their own failures to plan and execute.

Governors are the most successful when they are given the flexibility to lead. The federal government can provide the resources, but it should not take away too much flexibility. New York is not New Mexico. South Dakota is not South Carolina.

Our Constitution has it right: Keep control and decision making close to the people. We are seeing that play out in every state today. We face a painful challenge, but we will get through it. When we do, we will look back and see that governors rose to meet the challenge, and they did it best when Washington did not impose too much on them.”