#firsthomebuyers

ScoMo does Westpac a favour via first home buyer scheme

What a joke our government is. Whack Westpac over the head again because it has been a “very naughty boy” by banning it from the government’s first home buyer deposit scheme. While it might look good in front of voters to bash a bank, what they don’t realize is Westpac actually wins.

Westpac should count it’s blessings. Honestly. Piling first home buyers in at the top of the property bubble is hardly the best scheme for prudent risk management. Given the banks haven’t been granted the ability to properly risk adjust for these buyers, it works in Westpac’s favour to be booted from this ridiculous plan.

Here is the deal. Although ‘owning’ one’s own home has always been part of the Game of Life in Australia, at what point will our law makers look to failure in policy as a reason kids can’t join the property ladder instead of trying to grant their wish and saddle them with negative equity right around the corner? Perhaps address productivity, tax reform and unnecessary red tape as opposed to bash a bank, tighten the regulatory noose and eject them from the sandpit by subsidizing a future car wreck.

In reality the scope of business Westpac may have made from this scheme is likely to be so small it would be a rounding error to the group. Yet more virtue signaling from our political class. Utter. Waste. Of. Time.

No, ScoMo!

For a Conservative party to push a subsidy of up to 20% of the value of a property for first time home buyers shows how bereft of policy it is. When Vic Premier Daniel Andrews raised a similar plan in March 2017 CM trashed it.

Think about it. Home prices have started to fall in major capitals because of a lack of demand thanks to astronomical prices and tapped out borrowers. This is before the Royal Commission puts the brakes on lending.

Why provide a subsidy to first home buyers toward the top of a bubble? It is not the role of the taxpayer to subsidize nor insure the downside risk in the event of the owner going into negative equity. What happened to free market economics?

What will this 20% subsidy do? If a couple go house hunting with a budget of $800,000, they will be able to shoot for a $1mn property. It might end up being the same property, pushed up by the desperate buyer thanks to the subsidy creating a false sense of security. So the reality is the taxpayer and the homeowner may end up in the red the day they move in. What a policy!!

Has ScoMo just called the top of the property market?