#childgrooming

Does kneeling lead to healing?

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Does kneeling lead to healing?

Around the world, we have seen images of law enforcement officers kneeling to protest police brutality in the wake of the inexcusable murder of George Floyd. It begs the question if the UK police officers in the picture above don’t practice brutality themselves, why are they kneeling for the actions of a small band of police officers in a different country? The same goes for the majority of honest cops in America who put their lives in harms way to protect and serve us.

At what point in society do we acknowledge such vacuous virtue signalling as anything other than an act of cowardice and an insult to the very people they claim to be apologizing to?

A bigger question might be why weren’t these British cops kneeling when police across the country were outed over the deliberate and documented 20-year cover-up of child grooming gangs on the grounds they didn’t want to be seen as racist by targeting the overwhelming majority of the known perpetrators – Asian (Pakistani) men?

We summarised the outcome of the Rotherham Inquiry here. It is shocking beyond belief and 19,000 of these identified white girls will never recover from the psychological scars. Their skin colour shouldn’t matter. It is what happens when identity politics clouds common sense. How could anyone condone arresting the fathers who were trying to break their underage girls out of rape dens? Because that is what happened. Minors were doused with gasoline and threatened with being set alight by their captors if they told anyone about what had happened.

Where were these same BLM-in-name-only protestors in the UK calling for justice for these poor girls when it became public knowledge? Are demonstrations merely determined by the most fashionable social justice issue du jour? Is systematic rape based on ethnicity on one’s own doorstep deemed less contentious than systematic racism in America?

Kneeling is nothing short of submitting to mob rule. Pure and simple. Furthermore, how does getting on one’s knees heal racial divide and conquer police brutality? We’ll get to that.

We were struck by a video of a Trump rally several years ago where the organizer invited the President of BLM New York up on stage to allow him to talk to those assembled. The outcome was not what the prevailing sentiment would have guessed before viewing the clip.

The problem with BLM is the way it seems to convey mixed messaging. BLM remains silent when so many blacks are dying in Chicago from gun violence not at the hands of police? When a 77yo former African American police captain in Louisville was shot and killed by rioters over a TV last week, BLM said nothing. It was too busy lashing out at white liberals abusing the #BlackLivesMatter Twitter hashtag to advertise their wokeness by putting black squares on the social media avatars.

And if cops truly felt so disgusted about George Floyd’s demise wouldn’t they have been better to strip off their blues, resign on the spot and trample on their badges to show how much the cause means to them?  It is hard to see the kneeling as anything more than a hollow gesture to rack up social woke points.

Why are they apologizing for things they haven’t done? If they have been privy to witnessing police brutality, did they speak up? Or were they ignored by politically-aligned police chiefs bent on seeking their next promotion by suppressing negative behavior under their watch to please city mayors?

That is not to say police officers don’t have a right to express themselves as private citizens but as public servants on the job they should not be succumbing to acts of appeasement.  They should be reprimanded for such displays of weakness. How can they keep public order by such acts of surrender? What message do they send to crowds?

Throughout history, kneeling has been a token of submission. The height of self-debasement. The term “die standing or live on your knees” derives from that.

Earlier in the week, we wrote of a YouTuber Smooth Sanchez who was claiming to represent Black Lives Matter (BLM). He was asking white women to get on their knees to admit their white privilege, apologize and pay reparations. Some complied. Some refused, only be taunted with vile abuse in the form of “racist“, “bigot” or “Neo-Nazi.

What is it with the idea that ordinary law-abiding citizens who happen to be white must atone for the sins of people they are not related to and weren’t alive at the time much of the oppression was committed? How will self-loathing whites kneeling and asking for forgiveness help black people in reality, especially if they haven’t done a thing? How do we stop racism if we constantly seek to define everything by it? Surely by making skin colour the basis by which we function as a society, then racism can’t be effectively stamped out.

In 2017 we wrote about four Ann Arbor councillors taking a knee during the national anthem ahead of session. Given these people were in a position to influence policy why didn’t they head down to the Ann Arbor Police Department and study the data about police brutality, the extent of the problem (if any) and what steps were put in place to mitigate it?

Ann Arbor is a city of 360,000. Crime versus the national average of cities it’s size revealed that burglary and motor vehicle theft were at rates at half the national average. Murder 1/5th. Robbery at less than half. Assault in line. Rape, marginally above.

Taken in isolation, Ann Arbor PD killed one African-American woman who attacked them with a knife in 2014. Since then a clean slate. If new measures to weed out bad apples were put in place, shouldn’t those councillors have promoted the successful program that they implemented instead of joining a chorus which threw its own law enforcement it sets the guidelines for under the bus?

Wouldn’t it be better to have city mayors incentivise police chiefs to proactively manage their officers in ways which would lead to the types of outcomes the public wants? We doubt the wimpy response of Ann Arbor politicians is an isolated event. That is the problem. Making a public statement to appear virtuos but fail to follow up with meaningful policy achieved what exactly? Their actions were as useless as draping one’s social media avatar with whatever cause is fashionable to show one is against the bleeding obvious.

The fish rots at the head. No amount of kneeling will fix problems unless the raw data is openly discussed and the brutal truth examined. The Minneapolis PD was subject to a federal review of procedures in 2015. The statistics revealed that few officers were fired or suspended for claims made against them. The majority were either reprimanded or given extra coaching. Yet MPD still continued to see complaints pile up. This appears to be a senior management issue.

Bad (insert profession) deserve to be weeded out of any organisation, especially where public order is at stake.

Pointing the finger at the majority of law-abiding citizens who aren’t racist will do absolutely nothing to solve this crisis. As Mark D Robinson said, the majority is “the first ones taxed, the last ones considered and the first ones punished.

Having whites declare their white privilege on their knees will solve nothing. It is actually an insult to blacks for whites to think that apologizing for things they haven’t done just to feel better about themselves rather than seek to find solutions through constructive free speech which acknowledges history. It is the same mentality as pushing gender politics. Do these same people think telling capable, educated, intelligent and ambitious women that they need special treatment?

Having whites kneel will not lift one single black person out of the oppression so many Democrat lawmakers highlight when it is decades of their policies that have perpetuated the problems in the first place. It is actually racist to push this kind of tribalism, as many of our narrative busing videos of everyday African Americans attests to. 

In closing, if we want to take stupidity to the next level, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti publicly said he wants to drastically cut the police budget in coming years. One can only assume that stifling the one body that can keep communities safe will only enforce the very stereotypes that the death of George Floyd was supposed to stop. 

Kneeling does not lead to healing. Lets not pretend that it does. Bold leadership that avoids political correctness and identity politics is required.

Child sexual grooming in Rotherham – Details of The Inquiry

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The details of the Rotherham grooming gang scandal was tabulated in an independent inquiry looking at the problem between 1997-2013 showing the extent of the cover up. The table above shows the actions taken after 157 complaints about child grooming in Rotherham were made to the South Yorkshire Police since 2013. The Inquiry tabulates a case of a father being arrested for trying to get his daughter out of a rape den. A 12yo girl was raped in a park then doused in gasoline and threatened with being lit if she said anything about what has happened. The sad thing is that these gangs are wide spread – Rotherham, Rochdale, Newcastle, Bristol, Aylesbury, Oxford, Peterborough, Keighley, Newham, Leeds, Bradford, Telford, Sheffield and London. The report discusses how the gangs transfer the children within the ‘safe houses; in the network to keep the industry clandestine.

The Inquiry was given a list of 988 children known to children’s social care, or the Police. 51 were current cases and 937 historic. It read 66 case files in total. It took a randomised sample of 19 current and 19 historic cases. In 95% of the files sampled, there was clear evidence that the child had been a victim of sexual exploitation. Only two children (5%) were at risk of being exploited rather than victims. From the random samples, we concluded that it was very probable that a high proportion of the 988 children were victims.

Taking all these sources together, the Inquiry concluded that at least 1,400 children were sexually exploited between 1997 and 2013. This is likely to be a conservative estimate of the true scale of the problem. It was unable to assess the numbers of other children who may have been at risk of exploitation, or those who were exploited but not known to any agency. This includes some who were forced to witness other children being assaulted and abused.

The responses by the authorities were absolutely insane. Take some of the following examples from the report:

We read cases where a child was doused in petrol and threatened with being set alight, children who were threatened with guns, children who witnessed brutally violent rapes and were threatened that they would be the next victim if they told anyone. Girls as young as 11 were raped by large numbers of male perpetrators, one after the other. One said,What’s the point… I might as well be dead.

In two of the cases we read, fathers tracked down their daughters and tried to remove them from houses where they were being abused, only to be arrested themselves when police were called to the scene. In a small number of cases (which have already received media attention) the victims were arrested for offences such as breach of the peace or being drunk and disorderly, with no action taken against the perpetrators of rape and sexual assault against children.

One child who was being prepared to give evidence received a text saying the perpetrator had her younger sister and the choice of what happened next was up to her. She withdrew her statements. At least two other families were terrorised by groups of perpetrators, sitting in cars outside the family home, smashing windows, making abusive and threatening phone calls. On some occasions child victims went back to perpetrators in the belief that this was the only way their parents and other children in the family would be safe. In the most extreme cases, no one in the family believed that the authorities could protect them.

The Inquiry listed what had happened to these girls, aged as young as 11, after being discovered. It is shocking beyond belief:

Child A (2000) was 12 when the risk of sexual exploitation became known. She was associating with a group of older Asian men and possibly taking drugs. She disclosed having had intercourse with 5 adults. Two of the adults received police cautions after admitting to the Police that they had intercourse with Child A. Child A continued to go missing and was at high risk of sexual exploitation. A child protection case conference was held. It was agreed by all at the conference that Child A should be registered. However, the CID representative argued against the category of sexual abuse being used because he thought that Child A had been ‘100% consensual in every incident’. This was overruled, with all others at the case conference demonstrating a clear understanding that this was a crime and a young child was not capable of consenting to the abuse she had suffered. She was supported appropriately once she was placed on the child protection register.

Child F (2006) was a victim of serious sexual abuse when she was a young child. She was groomed for sexual exploitation by a 27-year-old male when she was 13. She was subjected to repeated rapes and sexual assaults by different perpetrators, none of whom were brought to justice. She repeatedly threatened to kill herself and numerous instances of serious self-harm were recorded in the case file, including serious overdoses and trying to throw herself in front of cars. Social workers worked to protect Child F after she was referred by the Police. There was good cooperation between children’s social care services, the Police, Risky Business and acute hospital services, where doctors were seriously concerned about her because of the number and seriousness of hospital admissions over such a short time, many associated with serious drug misuse and self-harm. There was evidence in the file of social workers, frontline managers and Risky Business workers doing everything possible to help Child F. She was eventually placed in secure care, where she stayed for several months. During this time she was kept safe and a process of therapeutic intervention began.

Child H (2008) was 11 years old when she came to the attention of the Police. She disclosed that she and another child had been sexually assaulted by adult males. When she was 12, she was found drunk in the back of a car with a suspected CSE (child sexual exploitation) perpetrator, who had indecent photos of her on his phone. Risky Business became involved and the Locality Team did an initial assessment and closed the case. Her father provided Risky Business with all the information he had been able to obtain about the details of how and where his daughter had been exploited and abused, and who the perpetrators were. This information was passed on to the authorities. Around this time, there were further concerns about her being a victim of sexual exploitation. She was identified as one of a group of nine children associating with a suspected CSE perpetrator. Her case had not been allocated by children’s social care. The Chair of the Strategy meeting expressed concern about her and considered she needed a child protection case conference. This does not appear to have been held. Three months later, the social care manager recorded on the file that Child H had been assessed as at no risk of sexual exploitation, and the case was closed. Less than a month later, she was found in a derelict house with another child, and a number of adult males. She was arrested for being drunk and disorderly (her conviction was later set aside) and none of the males were arrested. Child H was at this point identified as being at high risk of CSE. Risky Business, social care workers and the Police worked to support Child H and her father and she was looked after for a period. She suffered a miscarriage while with foster carers. Her family moved out of the area and Child H returned home. Some of the perpetrators were subsequently convicted.

Last week CM wrote about crime in London and how it has ballooned in recent years. A day after that it was revealed that London had a higher number of murders than New York. A 78-yo London pensioner was arrested after a person broke into his house and in the act of self defence the burglar was wounded and later died. So the criminal has more rights than the person exercising self defence. A father trying to save a daughter from being groomed gets arrested.

Yet political correctness and decades of turning a blind eye by the police allowed well documented cases of sexual grooming of children continue. A comedian that taught his girlfriend’s dog to do a Nazi salute faces a 12 month jail term tomorrow under the accusation of ‘hate speech’. Despite the tasteless nature of the joke do we think a comedian or a child rapist should be prioritized for prosecution? For all of the authorities meeting with senior social media heads to clamp down on ‘free speech’ when they could equally use those technologies and laws to capture texts and pornographic pictures of those people under suspicion of sexually exploiting children?

This is what the Inquiry had to say about the Police:

We deal with the response of South Yorkshire Police at some length throughout this report. While there was close liaison between the Police, Risky Business and children’s social care from the early days of the Risky Business project, there were very many historic cases where the operational response of the Police fell far short of what could be expected. The reasons for this are not entirely clear. The Police had excellent procedures from 1998, but in practice these appear to have been widely disregarded….We were contacted by someone who worked at the Rotherham interchange in the early 2000s. He described how the Police refused to intervene when young girls who were thought to be victims of CSE were being beaten up and abused by perpetrators. According to him, the attitude of the Police at that time seemed to be that they were all ‘undesirables’ and the young women were not worthy of police protection.

The Council was no better:

In 2004-2005, a series of presentations on CSE were first made to councillors and then other relevant groups and agencies, led by the external manager of Risky Business, from Youth Services. The presentations were unambiguous about the nature and extent of the problem…In 2006, a Conservative councillor requested a meeting with the Council Leader at which he expressed his concerns about CSE. This had come to his attention via constituents. He told the Inquiry that the Council Leader advised him the matters were being dealt with by the Police and requested that he did not raise them publicly…

Interviews with senior members revealed that none could recall the issue ever being discussed in the Labour (Party) Group until 2012. Given the seriousness of the subject, the evidence available, and the reputational damage to the Council, it is extraordinary that the Labour Group, which dominated the Council, failed to discuss CSE until then. Some senior members acknowledged that that was a mistake. Asked if they should have done things differently, they thought that as an administration they should have tackled the issues ‘head on’, including any concerns about ethnic issues.”

We could go on and on about the evidence discovered about the ‘Asian’ background of a majority of the perpetrators and how political correctness has allowed 1,000s of young girls’ lives have been destroyed because of the silence of the authorities. This is just one town. Without a doubt the ‘grooming industry’ operates in similar ways across the UK. The Inquiry found that taxi companies operated as part of the grooming gangs. It shouldn’t matter who commits the crimes or what their background is – it should matter how justice is served as a community that holds common decency as values. Even more importantly that law enforcement and the judiciary prosecute in a manner that sets an example such that it will never be tolerated.

All the above looks like appeasment, cowardice and a coordinated effort to hush up one of the most shameful periods in UK history.  This is only the beginning. As the famous saying goes, “In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.