#activeweek

When you next fill up, consider Shell

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Yet more Extinction Rebellion inspired lunacy. Do yourself a favour and consider filling up at a Shell service station next time you need petrol. In the latest Shell Must Fall post, the group boasts,

“As part of the SHELL MUST FALL Everywhere! *activeweek* international action week, people across Sweden have taken several Shell petrol stations offline through a set of targeted actions that made Shell unable to process payments at the pump.

Actions have been reported across several Swedish cities, including Lund, Örebro, Uppsala, and Malmö. A spokesperson issued the following statement:

“Every transaction that happens at these pumps delivers more profit to Shell and its shareholders. More profit at the expense of the Ogoni people in the Niger Delta, more profit at the expense of our air quality, more profit at the expense of the stability of our climate, our atmosphere.

We say enough is enough. Shell Must Fall!”

Given this mob wants a socialist agenda, they should reflect on Shell’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. This from the latest annual report:

…in 2018, we were recognised as one of the top three organisations in the Workplace Pride global lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersexed (LGBTI) inclusive workplace benchmark and earned a 100% score in the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s Corporate Equality Index. In addition, the 2018 Hampton Alexander Review ranked Shell first out of the Financial Times Stock Exchange (FTSE) 350 Oil & Gas Industry index companies and seventh out of the FTSE 100 Top 10 Best Performers. We actively monitor the representation of women and local nationals in senior leadership positions and have talent-development processes to support us in mitigating any biases and delivering a more diverse representation.”

Shell thinks the Niger Delta has a far different set of risks.

In our Nigerian operations, we face various risks and adverse conditions. These include: security issues surrounding the safety of our people, host communities and operations; sabotage and theft; our ability to enforce existing contractual rights; litigation; limited infrastructure; potential legislation that could increase our taxes or costs of operations; the effect of lower oil and gas prices on the government budget; and regional instability created by militant activities. Any of these risks or adverse conditions could have a material adverse effect on our earnings, cash flows and financial condition.

Perhaps when they storm into the shareholders meeting in May 2020 that they swot up on the facts before causing the collapse of Shell.